PTSD and the wounded soul
PTSD

PTSD and the Wounded Soul

What human experience is the most potent trigger for post-traumatic stress disorder? Ask 100 people this question, even doctors and psychiatrists, and you would receive a list of various traumatic experiences: car crashes, house fires, sexual assaults, shootings, stabbings, kidnappings, earthquakes and so on. The experiences would be varied but the essential theme the same: the future PTSD patient is the victim of some horrible, life-threatening event.

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Alzheimers and AI
Alzeimer's Disease

Alzheimer’s and AI

New drugs to treat Alzheimer’s are desperately needed – but new drugs are extremely hard to find. The team here at Neurocentrix are trialling several promising drugs and are all-too familiar with the long and painstaking process needed to bring a medication to the market.

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Depression reflex
Depression

The Depression Reflex

One of the paradoxes of the modern age is plummeting global poverty matched almost perfectly with rising clinical depression. Like never before we can defeat diseases, survive childbirth, elude predators, avoid war, and enjoy leisure, yet never before we been so unhappy. How can this be?

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Alzheimer's Missing Link
Alzeimer's Disease

Alzheimer’s Missing Link?

Alzheimer’s disease features the build-up of two distinct proteins in the brain: beta-amyloid, which accumulates in clumps, and tau, in tangles. But how exactly they relate to each other and the death of neurons has remained a mystery – perhaps until now.

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Evolution, Exercise, and the Aging Brain
Alzeimer's Disease

Evolution, Exercise, and the Aging Brain

At medical school we learnt very few certainties. Everything was a possibility, a probability, a risk, a trend, a likelihood. There were many rules of thumb, but very few rules. Yet amongst all the qualified circumspection, there was one iron-clad law: The human brain grows no new neurons. All the neurons we would ever have were present at birth, and from there it was all rapidly downhill for our neuron tally.

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Depression and Heart Disease
Depression

Partners in Crime: Depression and Heart Disease

Scientists have long observed an association between depression and heart disease. Depressed adults have a 66% greater risk of developing coronary artery disease. These patients are also more likely to progress to serious outcomes such as a heart attack – at least a quarter of cardiac patients suffer with depression. 

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